How to live in a global and disenchanted world Philosophy Seminar Living in a Global and Disillusioned World

How to live in a global and disenchanted world

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Amelia Valcárcel
Amelia Valcárcel, conductor

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  1. Amelia ValcárcelAmelia Valcárcel

    Es catedrática de Filosofía moral y política de la UNED y miembro del Consejo de Estado. Autora de más de  decena de libros, también ha participado en  obras colectivas. Ha sido dos veces finalista del Premio Nacional de Ensayo con los libros Hegel y la Ética y Del miedo a la igualdad. Editora de El concepto de igualdad, ha publicado Sexo y filosofía, La política de las mujeres, Ética contra estética, Los desafíos del feminismo ante el siglo XXI, del que es Editora, Rebeldes; Pensadoras del siglo XX, del que es también coordinadora y editora. Otras obras son El sentido de la libertad y Ética para un mundo global; Hablemos de Dios, en colaboración con Victoria Camps, y Feminismo en el mundo global.

     

How to live in a global and disenchanted world: the path of universalism and the cynicism of will

The world is global, and it has been like that for a short time. This assertion is not controversial anymore. Even those who defined themselves as anti-globalization movements now prefer to be called  alter-globalization. Nevertheless, there is something which is not highlighted in this globalized world: that it is also a disenchanted world. It comes from confirming the failures of false hopes and from retiring the great tales which were associated to them. Now it must shine light over what remains standing in its knowledge and strengths.

The judgment of our time is constantly transformed into the judgement of Enlightenment, the way of thinking that opened the path we are now crossing. The human self-conscience came together with a moral and political programme in which progress and universality were the trend. Now that the concept of collective rationality is needed, we confirm its limits. We go back to the feelings because we distrust reason as the guide for common good. We live in a world that does not want good principles, because it appears to lack the necessary will to translate them into reality.